Getting a good night’s sleep depends on many components. The most important overlying component is routine. Keeping the same sleep schedule actually trains the body and mind to expect and allow for system shut down to more easily get into a sleep mode and through the sleep cycles including REM sleep.

Many of my patients are law enforcement and fire fighters. And due to their varying schedules are cognizant of their need to address their sleep disorders such as OSA, than the Average patient.

Routine exercise is another component that is instrumental in getting a good night’s sleep. Again, keeping the same time every day for this routine is ideal because the body and mind will maximally turn on to work and oxygenate, like an engine, revving up and slowing down when finished. Maximally oxygenating at this time period is like a racing car fueling up and taking off. This boost of oxygen to our organs, muscles and most importantly, optimized the ability of all our system at this specific time on a routine basis and allows us to easily fall asleep because our energy has been discharged during our exercise.

Lastly is diet. Eating on a regular basis with foods that are optimized for different periods of the day is also essential. Having a good breakfast with eggs of yogurt or other sources of protein, along with fruits and natural juice, will supply the body with energy and protein to kick start the body and mind. After that, it is best to optimally eat small portions of vegetables, proteins and fruits four or more times during the day. The last meal shouldn’t be consumed later than 7pm so that our digestive system is not taxed during sleep and is able to slow down during sleep.

In summary routines with sleep patterns, exercise and diet is the optimum ideal to help insure a good night’s sleep.